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COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS ALERTS ARCHIVE

MARCH 2020    -    APRIL 2020   -    MAY 2020

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July 1, 2020

There are 210 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 8 deaths in Banning.

Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order
on Actions in Response to COVID-19


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today issued an executive order extending authorization for local governments to halt evictions for renters impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, through September 30.

The order also addresses a variety of issues in response to the pandemic, by extending provisions in earlier orders which allow adults to obtain marriage licenses via videoconferencing rather than in-person during the pandemic; waive eligibility re-determinations for Californians who participate in Medi-Cal, to ensure they maintain their health coverage; suspend face-to-face visits for eligibility for foster care; and permit In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program caseworkers to continue caring for older adults and individuals with disabilities through video-conferencing assessments.

The order also extends waivers temporarily broadening the capability of counties to enroll persons into the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, allowing for self-attestation of pregnancy and conditions of eligibility, and waiving in-person identification requirements.

In addition, the order extends provisions allowing for mail-in renewals of driver’s licenses and identification cards, to limit in-person transactions at the Department of Motor Vehicles, and extends timeframes related to the payment of real estate license application and renewal fees and continuing education requirements for licensees.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here and a copy can be found here.


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June 30, 2020

There are 200 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 8 deaths in Banning.

Contact:
Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087

Celebrate at home this Fourth of July – without visitors

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mRiverside County health officials remind all residents and visitors that coronavirus continues to pose serious health hazards and to not take part in social gatherings during the upcoming Fourth of July holiday.

Social gatherings are a source of spreading the disease. Reference the governor’s office.

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has continued to rise recently, along with hospitalizations and ICU usage throughout all of Southern California. The county today is reporting 662 new cases, which is a new high for a single day increase, and 17 new deaths from the virus. Health officials are concerned the Independence Day weekend could cause a spike if residents do not adhere to safety guidelines.

“We don’t want any more closures, but our numbers are going through the roof,” said Dr. Cameron Kaiser, public health officer. “Bars are part of the problem but so are private gatherings. Please don’t mix households, even if you think everyone is healthy, and instead celebrate the holiday with the people you live with. We started seeing more and more cases after Memorial Day and we can’t afford another jump after the Fourth of July.”

Hospitals have prepared for a surge in cases for months, and health officials remind the community that everyone has a part to play in flattening the curve and slowing the spread of the disease. These measures include wearing face coverings as required, maintain social distancing and frequent handwashing.

On Monday, Kaiser ordered all bars in Riverside County closed, following a recommendation by Gov. Gavin Newsom, who issued a similar order for seven California counties. The governor was reacting to a recent surge in coronavirus cases statewide and placement of several counties on a state-generated watch list, including Riverside County.

“This virus is very real, and we know it is spreading and growing,” said Riverside County Board Chair and Fourth District Supervisor V. Manuel Perez. “Gatherings of family and friends are dangerous right now, and underserved communities are especially impacted by these gatherings.”

Riverside County officials also remind residents to get screened at one of the many coronavirus testing sites located throughout the region. More than 200,000 tests have been conducted in Riverside County so far. For more information on testing, click www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing.

Governor Newsom Signs 2020 Budget Act

Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today signed the 2020 Budget Act – a $202.1 billion spending plan that strengthens emergency response, protects public health and safety, and promotes economic recovery while closing a $54.3 billion budget shortfall caused by the COVID-19 recession.

“In the face of a global pandemic that has also caused a recession across the world and here in California, our state has passed a budget that is balanced, responsible and protects public safety and health, education, and services to Californians facing the greatest hardships,” said Governor Newsom. “I thank Pro Tem Atkins, Speaker Rendon and both houses of the Legislature for their continued partnership and leadership during this challenging moment in our state’s history.”

The Budget makes critical investments to save lives and promote economic recovery by continuing critical purchases of personal protective equipment and other safeguards necessary to safely reopen the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. It protects public education and supports Californians facing the greatest hardships – since the pandemic is having a disproportionate impact on lower-wage workers, communities of color, and is further exacerbating income inequality. Finally, the Budget supports job creation, economic recovery and opportunity by recognizing and supporting the critical role small businesses play in job creation in the state.

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every sector of the state’s economy and has caused record high unemployment – almost 1 in 5 Californians who were employed in February were out of work in May – and further action from the federal government is needed given the magnitude of the crisis. The Governor continues his efforts to secure $1 trillion in flexible federal aid to state and local governments across the country. This additional support is critical to mitigate the worst effects of the public health crisis, encourage recovery, and support Californians in need.

Following are key provisions of the 2020 Budget Act:

Strengthening Emergency Response and Protecting Public Health

The Budget reflects estimated spending of $5.7 billion to respond directly to the COVID-19 pandemic. Expenditures include personal protective equipment necessary to reopen the economy, hospital surge preparation, and other expenditures to support populations at greater risk of contracting COVID-19. Under federal law, at least 75 percent of these expenditures will be reimbursed by the federal government. The Budget also includes a $716 million reserve within the Special Fund for Economic Uncertainties so the state can respond quickly to the changing conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Budget also strengthens the state’s emergency preparedness in other areas: new investments in wildfire prevention and mitigation, including $85.6 million to CAL FIRE for firefighting resources and surge capacity and $50 million for community power resiliency. The Budget also supports the new state Earthquake Early Warning Program, integrates the Seismic Safety Commission into the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, and significantly expands efforts to address cybersecurity threats.

The Budget also includes support for counties that are on the front lines of addressing the public health impacts of the pandemic. Of the $9.5 billion in Coronavirus Relief Fund received by the state, $4.5 billion is allocated to local school districts, $1.3 billion is allocated to counties, and $500 million to cities. The Budget also includes $750 million General Fund to provide support for counties experiencing revenue losses due to the pandemic. Funds are available for all counties in compliance with federal guidance and state health requirements on COVID-19 response. If sufficient federal funds are made available by October 15, 2020, the Budget provides an additional $250 million in support to counties in protecting programs serving vulnerable populations.

Protecting Public Education

The Budget takes a combination of steps to offset the more than $10 billion in revenue loss to K-14 schools caused by the COVID-19 recession, and defers $12.9 billion in payments into the next fiscal year to preserve programs and provide K-14 schools the resources needed to safely reopen. The state has also committed to purchasing personal protective equipment and other supplies needed to reopen schools safely.

The Budget also allocates a total of $5.3 billion to mitigate learning loss and support the immediate needs of students and schools, with a focus on students disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. The Budget also redirects $2.3 billion designated for long-term unfunded pension liabilities to reduce school (district) employer contribution rates in the next two years. Finally, the Budget commits to making supplemental appropriations above the Proposition 98 guarantee for several years starting in 2021-22, which will accelerate General Fund support for schools over the multi-year forecast period.

Supporting Californians Facing the Greatest Hardships

The Budget takes several steps to support Californians facing the greatest hardships by maintaining eligibility for the Medi-Cal program – including the expanded senior eligibility enacted in the 2019 Budget Act – and preserving optional benefits and Proposition 56 provider rate increases in the budget year. The Budget also maintains In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) service hours and developmental services rates at current levels for the budget year. It includes an increase in the overall maximum Supplemental Security Income/State Supplemental Payment grant by passing the federal cost-of-living adjustment on to recipients. The Budget maintains CalWORKS eligibility and grant levels and extends the time limit for aid to adult recipients from 48 months to 60 months.

The Budget also protects programs for working families and students, preserving last year’s expansion of the state Earned Income Tax Credit (including the Young Child Tax Credit) and expanding eligibility to include undocumented filers with a child under the age of six. It also preserves the Covered California health insurance subsidies for middle-income households enacted in the 2019 Budget Act, and protects Cal Grants at current levels of eligibility, including the new Cal Grant for students with dependent children.

The Budget also prioritizes funds to mitigate homelessness and takes a new approach by allocating $600 million for Project HomeKey to acquire permanent housing through the purchase and renovation of motel properties throughout the state. The Budget also includes $300 million General Fund to cities, counties, and continuums of care to support efforts to reduce homelessness.

Promoting Economic Recovery

Since small businesses will play a critical role in California’s economic recovery, the Budget provides an additional $75 million for loan loss mitigation and reducing the cost of capital for small businesses to address gaps in available federal assistance. These funds will be administered by the California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank. The Budget also expands the $800 Minimum Franchise Tax exemption for first-year corporations to all businesses – removing a barrier to small business creation for all types of small businesses.

Balanced Approach to Closing the Budget Gap

In January, the state was projecting a surplus of $5.6 billion; by the May Revision, the state confronted a budget deficit of $54.3 billion – a four-month swing of $60 billion caused by the COVID-19 recession. The Budget takes a balanced approach to closing the $54.3 billion budget deficit and sets aside $2.6 billion in the Special Fund for Economic Uncertainties, including $716 million for the state to respond quickly to the changing conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Budget is balanced through the following steps:

  • Reserves – The Budget draws down $8.8 billion in reserves from the Rainy Day Fund ($7.8 billion), the Safety Net Reserve ($450 million), and all funds in the Public School System Stabilization Account.
  • Triggers – The Budget includes $11.1 billion in reductions and deferrals that will be restored if at least $14 billion in federal funds are received by October 15. If the state receives a lesser amount between $2 billion and $14 billion, the reductions and deferrals will be partially restored.
  • Federal Funds – The Budget reflects $10.1 billion in federal funds that provide General Fund relief – including $8.1 billion that have already been received.
  • Revenues – The Budget generates $4.4 billion in new revenues in FY 2020-21 by temporarily suspending the use of net operating losses and temporarily limiting to $5 million the amount of business incentive credits a taxpayer can use in any given tax year.
  • Borrowing/Transfers/Deferrals – The Budget includes $9.3 billion in special fund borrowing and transfers, as well as other deferrals for K-14 schools. (Approximately $900 million in additional special fund borrowing is associated with the reductions to employee compensation and is contained in the trigger.)
  • Cancelled Expansions, Updated Assumptions and Other Solutions – The remaining $10.6 billion of solutions includes:
    • Cancelling multiple program expansions and anticipating increased government efficiencies.
    • Higher ongoing revenues above the May Revision forecast.
    • Lower health and human services caseload costs than the May Revision estimate.

The budget and related budget-implementing legislation signed by the Governor today include:

  • AB 75 by the Committee on Budget – Budget Act of 2019: augmentation.
  • AB 78 by the Committee on Budget – Bergeson-Peace Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank.
  • AB 79 by the Committee on Budget – Human services omnibus.
  • AB 80 by the Committee on Budget – Public health omnibus.
  • AB 81 by the Committee on Budget – Public health funding: health facilities and services.
  • AB 82 by the Committee on Budget – State government.
  • AB 83 by the Committee on Budget – Housing.
  • AB 84 by the Committee on Budget – Public employment and retirement.
  • AB 85 by the Committee on Budget – State taxes and charges.
  • AB 89 by Assemblymember Philip Ting (D-San Francisco) – Budget Act of 2020.
  • AB 90 by the Committee on Budget – Transportation.
  • AB 92 by the Committee on Budget – Public resources: omnibus trailer bill.
  • AB 93 by the Committee on Budget – Personal income taxes: earned income tax credit: young child tax credit: federal individual taxpayer identification number.
  • AB 100 by the Committee on Budget – State government.
  • AB 102 by the Committee on Budget – Retirement savings.
  • AB 103 by the Committee on Budget – Unemployment compensation benefits: COVID-19.
  • AB 119 by Assemblymember Philip Ting (D-San Francisco) – State employment: State Bargaining Units.
  • SB 74 by Senator Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles) – Budget Act of 2020. A line-item veto can be found here.
  • SB 98 by the Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review – Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. A signing message can be found here.
  • SB 116 by the Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review – Postsecondary education trailer bill.

Additional details regarding the 2020 Budget Act can be found in the Department of Finance’s Enacted Budget Summary, located at www.ebudget.ca.gov.


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State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

Date: June 28, 2020
Number: NR20-140
Contact: CDPHpress@cdph.ca.gov

state sealSACRAMENTO – The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California’s positivity rate – a key indicator of community spread – is trending modestly upward in the 14-day average. Hospitalization rates over the long-term are showing a slight uptick in the 14-day average. California has 211,243 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There have been 3,955,952 tests conducted in California. As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, an increase in the number of positive cases has been expected – increasing the importance of positivity rates to find signs of community spread. There have been 5,905 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic.

CA COVID-19 Numbers June 28 

Testing in California

As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, the California Department of Public Health is working to expand access to COVID-19 testing. Testing should be used for medical evaluation of persons with symptoms of COVID-19 as well as for efforts by public health agencies and essential employers to prevent and control the spread of COVID-19. Individuals prioritized for testing include: 

  • Hospitalized patients
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic healthcare workers, first responders, and other social service employees
  • Symptomatic individuals age 65 and older or symptomatic individuals of any age with chronic medical conditions that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness
  • Individuals who are tested as part of disease control efforts in high-risk settings
  • Asymptomatic residents and employees of congregate living facilities when needed to prevent disease transmission
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in essential occupations such as grocery store and food supply workers, utility workers and public employees
  • Other individuals with symptoms consistent with COVID-19

 As of June 27, there have been 3,955,952 tests conducted in California and reported to the California Department of Public Health. This represents an increase of 93,642 tests over the prior 24-hour reporting period. These numbers include data from commercial, private and academic labs, including Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford, and the  25 state and county health labs currently testing. The Department is now reporting all tests reported in California, rather than the total number of individuals tested.

Data Portal
The state has launched a user-friendly data portal at COVID-19 Statewide Update that tracks COVID-19 cases statewide and by county, gender, age and ethnicity. The portal also outlines statewide hospitalizations and testing efforts. The data presented on the portal is updated daily and will include additional information as it is available.

Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture
The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the disproportionate prevalence of underlying conditions such as asthma and heart disease among Latinos and African American Californians. Only by looking at the full picture can we understand how to ensure the best outcomes for all Californians.

The differences in health outcomes related to COVID-19 are most stark in COVID-19 deaths. We have nearly complete data on race and ethnicity for COVID-19 deaths, and we are seeing the following trends. Overall, for adults 18 and older, Latinos, African Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are dying at disproportionately higher levels. The proportion of COVID-19 deaths in African Americans is more than one-and-a-half times their population representation across all adult age categories. For Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, overall numbers are low, but almost double between the proportion of COVID-19 deaths and their population representation. More males are dying from COVID-19 than females, in line with national trends. More information is available at COVID-19 Race and Ethnicity Data.

 Health Care Worker Infection Rates
As of June 27, local health departments have reported 14,699 confirmed positive cases in health care workers and 86 deaths statewide.  

 Your Actions Save Lives
Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:  

  • Staying home except for essential needs/activities following local and state public health guidelines when patronizing approved businesses. To the extent that such sectors are re-opened, Californians may leave their homes to work at, patronize, or otherwise engage with those businesses, establishments or activities.
  • Practicing social distancing.
  • Wearing a cloth face mask when out in public.
  • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
  • Following guidance from public health officials.


What to Do if You Think You’re Sick
all ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath), call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. More than 100 community testing sites also offer free, confidential testing: Find a COVID-19 Testing Site.

For more information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on the California Department of Public Health’s Guidance web page.


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June 29, 2020

There are 189 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.



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Contact:
Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087

Bars ordered closed in Riverside County
in response to upswing in coronavirus cases 

Public Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser has ordered all bars in Riverside County closed to help slow the spread of coronavirus, which has seen a recent upswing in confirmed cases. 

The order, which is effective Tuesday (June 30), comes on the heels of a recommendation from Gov. Gavin Newsom, who suggested Sunday that Riverside and seven other counties on a watch list close their drinking establishments. Newsom also ordered on Sunday that seven counties, including Los Angeles County, close their bars. 

“People don’t social distance well after a couple drinks, and it’s one of the hardest environments to trace contacts in,” said Dr. Cameron Kaiser, Riverside County public health officer. “My hope is that this will be only temporary and further closures won’t be needed, but it all depends on what every one of us as a county do to slow more spread.” 

Bars had been allowed to operate in Riverside County since June 12 as the region and state reopened the economy under accelerated stage two. But local and state health officials became concerned as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases started to grow, along with an increase in hospitalizations and ICU beds in use.

“Since mid-June, there has been a growing health crisis with rising coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and ICU bed usage throughout our nation, the State of California and here in Riverside County,” said Riverside County Board Chair and Fourth District Supervisor V. Manuel Perez. “A local Riverside County order on bar closures has unfortunately become necessary to slow the spread of this virus. I want to remind everyone that facial coverings are a requirement, and encourage continuously keeping physical distance and washing our hands.”

Restaurants, pubs and breweries that offer dine-in services may still offer alcoholic drinks, but only in the same transaction as a meal. If a bar offers meals, they are required to comply with the same industry guidance as restaurants. In Riverside County, officials with the Department of Environmental Health will enforce the closure order, starting with reaching out to all impacted bars, pubs, breweries and restaurants to explain the order and impacts to their operations. Officials said they believe most bars will comply with the order, but those who do not may face additional action.


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June 26, 2020

There are 178 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Media contact: Brooke Federico Riverside County Public Information Officer
(951) 743-0075
Public contact: 2-1-1 (Hablo Espanol) 

Board Offices and Executive Office temporarily close,
next Board meeting will be virtual

After several employees who work at the County Administrative Center (CAC) were confirmed to have coronavirus, all board offices at the CAC and the executive office have temporarily closed. The office closures impact portions of the fourth and fifth floors of the CAC. The rest of the building remains open. 

The next Board of Supervisors meeting scheduled for Tuesday (June 30) will be virtual as permitted by the State of California during the pandemic. Members of the public may watch and listen online at livestream.com/rivcolive or www.facebook.com/RivCoCOB/.

Community members may still speak before the board via telephone. To speak during public comment or on an agenda item, register with the Clerk of the Board’s Office at least 24 hours in advance online at www.rivcocob.org/comments. A follow up email with additional instructions will be provided.

Approximately 200 employees in the affected offices are in the process of being tested. In accordance with disease containment recommendations from RUHS - Public Health, the office spaces were cleaned and disinfected to curb continued transmission.

“This is an important reminder that coronavirus is present throughout all of Southern California and any one of us may contract the virus,” said County Executive Officer George Johnson. “We’ve acted quickly to temporarily close and set up testing to protect employees and residents who visit our offices.”

Employees will telecommute until cleared to return to work. Board offices can still be reached by emailing the district office or the clerk of the board.


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June 26, 2020
Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE Contact: Riverside County Joint Information Center
(951) 955-5087

Recreational team sports, including youth sports,
still not permitted in Riverside County

Youth sports are not yet permitted; individual fitness may continue with modifications 

Riverside County SealAs Riverside County continues to safely reopen additional activities and sectors of the economy, the return of youth sports has been on the minds of many parents and young athletes countywide. 

Currently, the California Department of Public Health has determined that no recreational team sports are permitted, and that the fitness guidance used for gyms and other fitness facilities is not for use for team sports activities. 

Youth and recreational team sports are currently designated as part of stage 3 of Gov. Newsom’s reopening plan. Riverside County remains in accelerated stage 2 that has seen the return of restaurants, nail salons and gyms with necessary health protocols and modifications. 

Individual fitness guidance as provided by Riverside County and CDPH may be found at www.RivCoBizHelp.org. Find the most up-to-date information about recreational team sports here https://covid19.ca.gov/roadmap-counties/.


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June 25, 2020

There are 169 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Governor Newsom Declares Budget Emergency
to Support State’s Response to COVID-19


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today issued a proclamation of a budget emergency to make additional resources available to fund the state’s ongoing emergency response to the COVID-19 pandemic, ensuring the availability of funding for personal protective equipment, medical equipment and other expenditures as necessary to support a potential hospital surge and provide necessary services to vulnerable populations.

Today’s proclamation clears the way for the Legislature to pass legislation allowing the state to draw from the state’s rainy day fund to help California continue to meet the COVID-19 crisis, which has triggered a global economic crisis and a $54.3 billion state budget deficit.

The text of the Governor’s proclamation can be found here and a copy can be found here.


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Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Media contact:
Brooke Federico
Riverside County Public Information Officer
(951) 743-0075 

More Businesses Eligible For Small Business Grants

Second round of funding applications opens Monday with extended deadline

Riverside County SealSole proprietors and others are now eligible for the second round of funding provided to small businesses that have been especially hit hard during the coronavirus pandemic. The expanded eligibility includes sole proprietors, which are those businesses that do not have employees, as well as businesses that have received an SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan or advance.

Businesses may apply for the second round of funding starting Monday (June 29) for up to $10,000 in direct support. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis until August 31, 2020.

The first round of funding for the small business program resulted in $7.3 million that will be distributed to 738 small businesses in Riverside County. The Riverside County Board of Supervisors dedicated $45 million to the program, as part of federal funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.

“We heard from the business community and we agree. Specifically, we heard from sole proprietors that need support just like any other business that was hit hard by the pandemic and hasn’t received the Paycheck Protection Program,” said Chair V. Manuel Perez, Fourth District Supervisor. “I am proud to make this announcement as they too have sacrificed and struggled, so please apply for relief funding. It is only a small way that we as a county thank you for keeping our economy moving forward.”

Available funding is limited and applications will be reviewed and processed by Main Street Launch, a third-party nonprofit. Applications must meet certain criteria.

Grants are not available to businesses that have received federal funding through the Paycheck Protection Program. Awardees must also develop and implement a safe reopening plan that addresses employee and customer health prior to disbursement.

“We want to help as many businesses as possible,” said Vice Chair Karen Spiegel, Second District Supervisor. “Expanding the eligibility criteria and extending the deadline will mean many more small businesses are potentially saved from closing.”

Approximately 96 percent of businesses in Riverside County are small businesses with fewer than 50 employees. The small business grants are intended to promote business sustainability, job retention, and the overall economic preservation of small businesses throughout the county.

For more information, including instructions on how to apply, click here. If you have questions about the grant program, please send an email to rcfaq@mainstreetlaunch.org or call (951) 955-0493.


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June 24, 2020

There are 168 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.


City of Banning Independence Day Celebration Canceled

BanningSeal_2B SM

The City of Banning has canceled the Independence Day celebration and fireworks display due to restrictions on public gathers as well as budget constraints. 


fireworkscanceled


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June 23, 2020

There are 162 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

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Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order on
Actions in Response to COVID-19  6.22.20


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an executive order in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The order extends a waiver that allows retailers to temporarily pause in-store redemption of beverage containers to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The order also temporarily suspends the requirement for recycling centers to hold a minimum number of hours of operation.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here and a copy can be found here.


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June 22, 2020

There are 156 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087

Riverside County to Begin Coronavirus Antibody
Testing as Part of Prevalence Study

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mThousands of Riverside County residents will soon be contacted and asked to take part in a coronavirus antibody testing study being sponsored by county health officials. 

About 3,500 randomly selected county residents will be asked if they are interested in taking part in the study, which could determine whether they have been exposed and developed COVID-19 antibodies. The study will help determine the Riverside County prevalence of COVID-19, which will be used to inform planning efforts. Potential participants will be contacted by telephone or email starting later this week.

“We are asking those who are contacted to strongly consider taking part in the study,” said Kim Saruwatari, director of Riverside County Public Health. “It’s important to know the extent of the spread of the virus have developed antibodies. That information is vital as we move forward.”

Residents cannot volunteer for the study, in part, because health officials want a more representative sampling of the community. Antibodies are part of the body’s defense against infections, develop and stay in the blood even after the infection is over. Public Health is not creating the list of participants and will not collect the individual information from the study. 

As a reminder, the medical community does not yet know the extent of the benefits of testing positive for coronavirus antibodies. For example, it is not yet known if someone can contract the virus again after testing positive for antibodies. Conducting this study will provide valuable information as COVID-19 continues to be researched.

“Public health officials around the world continue to learn about coronavirus and this antibody study could enhance our local understanding of this disease,” said Riverside County Board Chair and Fourth District Supervisor V. Manuel Perez. “It is important that Riverside County residents get the regular test for coronavirus to protect their families, coworkers and communities, and, if contacted, to participate in an antibody study as well to help our research efforts.”

Those who are selected will complete a survey, then have blood drawn at one of nine sites located throughout the county. These sites are not the same locations where coronavirus testing for active infections is taking place. 

For more information about the antibody testing www.rivcoph.org/antibodystudy.


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Governor Newsom, Senate President pro Tempore Atkins and Assembly Speaker Rendon Issue Statement on Budget Agreement


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom, Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon today announced that they have reached an agreement on the 2020-21 state budget:

“The COVID-19 global pandemic has caused a sudden and dramatic change in our nation’s and state’s economic outlook – and has had a cascading effect on our state budget. California was better positioned for this sudden change than at almost any time in its history, building out record reserves following years of responsible budgeting. Even still, the size and scope of the pandemic and the accompanying economic crisis have been unprecedented – leaving California to make hard choices and figure out how to sustain critical services with much less.

“In the face of these challenges, we have agreed on a budget that is balanced, responsible and protects core services – education, health care, social safety net and emergency preparedness and response. This budget also invests in California small businesses harmed by the pandemic.

“This agreement reflects our shared commitment to supporting schools, and is built on a foundation of equity – allocating billions of dollars for students most affected by learning loss and continuing our state’s leadership toward reforming the criminal justice system.

“To be clear, this budget required some tough decisions and more work remains ahead. But they were necessary steps for keeping California on firm fiscal footing while we continue to meet the COVID-19 challenge, protect vital services and our most vulnerable communities, and build a strong fiscal bridge to a safe, speedy economic resurgence. Californians are doing their part – now it’s imperative for our federal partners to pass a responsible and comprehensive relief plan so states and local communities can continue to keep Americans safe while leading our national economic recovery.”


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June 19, 2020

There are 146 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts 

state sealSACRAMENTO – The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California’s positivity rate – a key indicator of community spread – remains stable in the 14-day average. Hospitalization rates remain stable over the long-term while showing a slight uptick in the 14-day average. California has 169,309 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There have been 3,234,412 tests conducted in California. As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, an increase in the number of positive cases has been expected – increasing the importance of positivity rates to find signs of community spread. There have been 5,424 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic. 

June 20 CA COVID-19 Numbers

Testing in California

As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, the California Department of Public Health is working to expand access to COVID-19 testing. Testing should be used for medical evaluation of persons with symptoms of COVID-19 as well as for efforts by public health agencies and essential employers to prevent and control the spread of COVID-19. Individuals prioritized for testing include: 

  • Hospitalized patients
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic healthcare workers, first responders, and other social service employees
  • Symptomatic individuals age 65 and older or symptomatic individuals of any age with chronic medical conditions that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness
  • Individuals who are tested as part of disease control efforts in high-risk settings
  • Asymptomatic residents and employees of congregate living facilities when needed to prevent disease transmission
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in essential occupations such as grocery store and food supply workers, utility workers and public employees
  • Other individuals with symptoms consistent with COVID-19

As of June 19, there have been 3,234,412 tests conducted in California and reported to the California Department of Public Health. This represents an increase of 78,710 tests over the prior 24-hour reporting period. These numbers include data from commercial, private and academic labs, including Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford, and the 25 state and county health labs currently testing. The Department is now reporting all tests reported in California, rather than the total number of individuals tested.

 

Data Portal

The state has launched a user-friendly data portal at COVID-19 Statewide Update that tracks COVID-19 cases statewide and by county, gender, age and ethnicity. The portal also outlines statewide hospitalizations and testing efforts. The data presented on the portal is updated daily and will include additional information as it is available.

 

Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture

The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the disproportionate prevalence of underlying conditions such as asthma and heart disease among Latinos and African American Californians. Only by looking at the full picture can we understand how to ensure the best outcomes for all Californians.

The differences in health outcomes related to COVID-19 are most stark in COVID-19 deaths. We have nearly complete data on race and ethnicity for COVID-19 deaths, and we are seeing the following trends. Overall, for adults 18 and older, Latinos, African Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are dying at disproportionately higher levels. The proportion of COVID-19 deaths in African Americans is more than one-and-a-half times their population representation across all adult age categories. For Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, overall numbers are low, but almost double between the proportion of COVID-19 deaths and their population representation. More males are dying from COVID-19 than females, in line with national trends. More information is available at COVID-19 Race and Ethnicity Data.

 

Health Care Worker Infection Rates

As of June 19, local health departments have reported 13,150 confirmed positive cases in health care workers and 82 deaths statewide. 

 

Your Actions Save Lives

Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:  

  • Staying home except for essential needs/activities following local and state public health guidelines when patronizing approved businesses. To the extent that such sectors are re-opened, Californians may leave their homes to work at, patronize, or otherwise engage with those businesses, establishments or activities.
  • Practicing social distancing.
  • Wearing a cloth face mask when out in public.
  • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
  • Following guidance from public health officials.


What to Do if You Think You’re Sick

Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath), call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. More than 100 community testing sites also offer free, confidential testing: Find a COVID-19 Testing Site.

For more information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on the California Department of Public Health’s Guidance web page.


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June 18, 2020

There are 144 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Face Coverings Required in Public Spaces

state sealCloth face coverings or masks help reduce the spread of coronavirus especially when combined with physical distancing and frequent hand washing. Starting June 18, Californians must wear face coverings in common and public indoor spaces and outdoors when distancing is not possible. Learn more about the guidance and limited exceptions here.



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Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Media contact: Riverside County Joint Information Center,
951-955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1 

Statewide face covering requirement responds
to increased cases, supports local reopening efforts

Riverside County SealRiverside County officials urge everyone to follow the state’s face covering requirement to curb the recent increase in coronavirus cases, as well as support local reopening efforts.

Cases of coronavirus have increased, which is an expected outcome resulting from people visiting more places in the community. Riverside County officials continue to urge all residents, employees and business operators to take necessary safety steps to slow the spread of the disease.

“This pandemic has hit hard all of our communities. But in particular, people of color and vulnerable communities such as seniors, farm workers and those with compromised immune systems. We see a rise in positive cases and hospital bed usage in the county but more so in the Coachella Valley,” said Chair V. Manuel Perez, Fourth District Supervisor. “Social distancing, washing our hands and wearing facial coverings are all simple measures that we can all abide by to protect ourselves and our fellow neighbors. I am happy that our Governor has made this decision.”

Coronavirus spreads through droplets expelled while sneezing, coughing or talking. People who carry the disease and do not show symptoms can still spread the disease to others. Covering the nose and mouth with a cloth face covering, bandana or neck gaiter, keeps these droplets in.

Face coverings should be washed regularly to keep clean. Public health officials also remind residents to keep six feet of distance between others while in public and to frequently wash their hands.


___________________________________

June 17, 2020

There are 137 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087 

Riverside County creates “mobile testing team” to serve targeted communities

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mAs Riverside County continues to expand its coronavirus testing capabilities, health officials have formed a “mobile testing team” to serve targeted populations or communities. 

The team, made up of nurses, emergency medical technicians and paramedics, set up testing locations for one or two days as needed then quickly move on to another site, said Kim Saruwatari, director of Riverside County Public Health. Normally testing sites are set up with the idea they would be based there for weeks or months.

“The mobile testing team gives us the flexibility to complete testing at different locations where there is a targeted need, such as hard-to-reach communities,” said Saruwatari. “Once the need is served, then we can quickly move them to the next location.”

Recently, the mobile team set up a one-day testing site at the Ben Clark Training Center, Idyllwild Library in the San Jacinto Mountains and screened about 162 residents. Other future locations include the Morongo Casino, Edgemont Women’s Club in Moreno Valley and the foothill community of Anza south of Hemet.

“According to data, the pandemic is impacting vulnerable communities and people of color the most. Whether that be seniors in skilled nursing facilities, agricultural workers in the fields, or the homeless in encampments, we need to do all we can to meet the moment and suppress the pandemic,” said Chair V. Manuel Perez, Fourth District Supervisor. “Expanding sites and deploying mobile testing is a responsible and creative way to flatten the curve.”

The creation of the mobile team was one of several changes to the county’s testing program. Others include the closing of the Blythe testing site on Saturday; the adding of a test site at Bagdouma Park Community Center, 51-251 Douma St., Coachella 92236 (Appointment: 888.634.1123; https://lhi.care/covidtesting; and adding of a site at Moreno Valley Senior Center, 25075 Fir Ave., Moreno Valley 92553 (Appointment: 888.634.1123; https://lhi.care/covidtesting; and closing of the Corona testing site.

Testing at the county-run sites is open to anyone, whether they have symptoms or not, and there are no out-of-pocket costs to individuals. Participants will be asked to provide information about their health insurance, but they will not be charged any share of costs or copay, and will be allowed to get tested even if they do not provide the insurance information. You must have an appointment to get tested.

So far, more than 160,000 Riverside County residents have been tested at the 16 total community test sites, along with screenings at clinics, hospitals, private labs and other locations. For a complete list of all testing locations and instructions on how to make an appointment, visit www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing.


___________________________________

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Brooke Federico Public Information Officer
(951) 955-1130
bcfederico@rivco.org 

More businesses set to reopen Friday

Riverside County SealAs Riverside County continues to move to reopen its economy, county officials are announcing the types of businesses that may reopen Friday (June 12) as part of the state’s additional businesses now included in accelerated stage two.

Riverside County health officials emphasize, however, that as residents visit more places in the community, it is ever-more important to take steps to protect themselves from coronavirus. Officials urge residents to continue to wear face coverings when they leave the home and maintain social distancing when out in public. Frequent hand washing is also important to help slow the spread of coronavirus. 

Residents are encouraged to visit businesses that are taking safety precautions for their employees and customers by following local guidance and industry-specific guidance issued by the state. Additional business guidance will be made available on RivCoBizHelp.org website, with input from the Riverside County Economic Recovery Task Force. 

“We have long looked forward to reopening more Riverside County businesses, which provide valuable goods, services and jobs vital to the fabric of our economy,” said Vice Chair Karen Spiegel, Second District Supervisor. “It’s very important that while visiting these businesses, all residents continue to do their part to slow the spread of the disease by wearing face coverings and maintaining six feet from others.” 

The businesses that will be eligible to open Friday include:
◼ Hotels, motels, inns (for tourism and travel)
◼ Schools, day camps, daycares
◼ Campgrounds and outdoor recreation
◼ Filming for television and music industries
◼ Restaurants, bars and wineries
◼ Museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums
◼ Professional sports (no audience)
◼ Movie theaters and family entertainment centers
◼ Gyms and fitness centers

Among the business that are not allowed at this stage include some personal care businesses, including nail salons, threading and waxing, as well as youth sports, team sports, weddings and libraries.

As always, residents of all ages are encouraged to get tested, with or without symptoms, to identify where the disease is currently present in the community and where it is not. Testing continues to be an integral focus as more residents visit more businesses. Visit www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing for more information on testing locations and how to make an appointment.


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June 15, 2020

There are 137 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.


___________________________________

June 12, 2020

___________________________________



Contact:
Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087

Coronavirus testing returns to Blythe; other changes announced for test sites 

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mCoronavirus testing is available again in Blythe for residents of the eastern Riverside County community who want to know whether they have contracted the virus. 

Testing started June 10 at the site -- 445 N. Broadway Avenue – and will continue for two weeks. Riverside County health officials had previously operated a testing location in Blythe and are returning because there is a need to know the extent of spread in the community and a recent outbreak at a local state prison.

The opening of the Blythe site was one of several changes to the sites made to provide testing services to a wider portion of community. Additional moves include:
--The walk-up sites in Mecca, San Jacinto and Valle Vista outside Hemet have closed.
--A walk-up site at 31215 Wild Meadow Drive in French Valley near Temecula has opened. The location operates Tuesday through Saturday between 7 a.m. until 7 p.m.
--A walk-up site at the Edgemont Women’s Club in Moreno Valley, 21640 Cottonwood Ave., will be operate June 17 through June 19 between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

Testing at the county-run sites is open to anyone, whether they have symptoms or not, and there are no out-of-pocket costs to individuals. Participants will be asked to provide information about their health insurance, but they will not be charged any share of costs or copay, and will be allowed to get tested even if they do not provide the insurance information. You must have an appointment to get tested. 

More than 146,000 coronavirus tests have been conducted in Riverside County, with more than 10,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus.

Testing continues to be an integral focus as more residents visit more businesses. Visit www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing for more information on testing locations and how to make an appointment.


___________________________________

Contact: CDPHpress@cdph.ca.gov


California Public Health Officials Provide COVID-19 Update

Positivity Rate – a Key Indicator of Community Spread -- Remains Stable

State Releases Guidance for Nail Salons and Other Personal Care Services

 New Personal Care Guidance Includes Strict Modifications
to Reduce Risk of COVID-19 Transmission

state sealSACRAMENTO – The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California’s positivity rate – a key indicator of community spread -- remains stable in the 14-day average. Hospitalization rates remain stable over the long-term while showing a slight uptick in the 14-day average. California has 141,983 confirmed cases to date, and 2,662,258 tests have been conducted in California. As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, an increase in the number of positive cases has been expected – increasing the importance of positivity rates to find signs of community spread. There have been 4,943 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic.

California Hospitalization Trend Lines Opens in new window



"As California continues to release guidance to help Californians lower the risk of COVID-19 transmissions in a number of settings, it’s important to remember that guidance doesn’t mean ’go.’ Once having met state health requirements, county public health officers will use county health data to decide when it’s appropriate to reopen sectors in each county," said Dr. Sonia Angell, State Public Health Officer and Director of the California Department of Public Health. "COVID-19 remains a real threat to Californians. Protect yourself and those around you by keeping a physical distance of six feet, wearing a face covering, and washing hands frequently." 

Given the state’s vast geographic diversity, many counties have attested to epidemiological readiness and overall preparedness and are able to move at their own pace through the reopening process depending on local conditions. California provides guidance on how local jurisdictions should modify operations to reduce risk for infection should the local jurisdiction decide to reopen a specific sector. Local officials in counties with attestations determine when specific sectors of their economy that have state guidance posted will reopen. It is up to the local health officers to make decisions regarding reopening specific sectors based upon the epidemiology and readiness of the county.

Expanded Personal Care Services

The California Department of Public Health today released guidance (PDF) for expanded personal services for counties with attestations, which includes personal care that requires touching a client’s face, e.g. facials, electrolysis, and waxing. This guidance also applies to esthetician, skin care, and cosmetology services; electrology; nail salons; body art professionals, tattoo parlors, and piercing shops; and massage therapy (in non-healthcare settings). This guidance includes stringent protections intended to support a safe, clean environment for workers and customers. For example, workers and customers at nail salons, tattoo parlors and massage businesses must wear face coverings.

This guidance is instructive on how businesses should operate during the COVID-19 pandemic, to reduce the risk of transmission. Local health officials should decide when the sectors covered by the guidance can resume operations following their review of local epidemiological data including cases per 100,000 populations, rate of test positivity, and local preparedness to support a health care surge, vulnerable populations, contact tracing and testing.

Review of State Restrictions on Attendance Capacities for Constitutionally Protected Activities, Including Places of Worship

The California Department of Public Health today released updated guidance (PDF) for places of worship, providers of religious services and cultural ceremonies, and corresponding direction for other constitutionally protected activities, such as the right to protest. This guidance replaces guidance issued in May and does not obligate places of worship to resume in-person activity. It is strongly recommended that places of worship continue to facilitate remote services and other related activities for those who are vulnerable to COVID-19 including older adults and those with co-morbidities.

Under the updated guidance, capacity limitations for indoor services remain the same. Places of worship may continue to hold indoor religious services and funerals that limit attendance to 25% of the building’s capacity, or up to 100 attendees, whichever is lower.

Today’s updated guidance lifts the state’s numerical cap for outdoor attendance at places of worship and other constitutionally protected First Amendment activities. Local health officials should consider limitations on outdoor attendance, factoring in their jurisdiction’s COVID-19 key health indicators. At a minimum, outdoor attendance should be limited naturally through the implementation of strict physical distancing measures of a minimum of six feet between attendees from different households.

The California Department of Public Health, in consultation with local health officials, will regularly review and assess the impact of these guidelines on public health and provide further direction as part of a phased-in restoration of in-person activities in places of worship.


More information about the state’s COVID-19 guidance is on the California Department of Public Health’s Guidance web page.

More information about reopening California and what individuals can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.


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June 11, 2020

There are 130 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 7 deaths in Banning.

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact:
Jose Arballo Jr., RUHS-Public Health
951-712-3705
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087

Riverside County passes 10,000-case mark of confirmed coronavirus cases 

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mRiverside County health officials are urging residents to remember the importance of continuing safe health practices as the county passed 10,000 confirmed coronavirus cases Thursday (June 11).

“The 10,000-case figure is a stark reminder that coronavirus is still active in the community and we need to continue the health practices that previously helped us flatten the curve,” said Kim Saruwatari, director of Riverside University Health System-Public Health. 

Health officials have long urged residents to wear face coverings whenever they leave the home and maintain social distancing in public areas. Frequent hand washing is also an important way to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

As Riverside County expands the economy and opens areas for more public interaction, health officials said they expected an increase in cases. It is not known what trends will hold for the novel virus during the summer, however, many viruses do slow during the summer months.

“We forecasted sporadic outbreaks through the summer, and those forecasts so far are coming true,” said Dr. Cameron Kaiser, Riverside County health officer. “It’s time to think about what the fall will bring, and those initial estimates aren’t good. If we’re not observing social distancing and facial coverings, two things that helped before and are helping now, we’re going to lose the progress we’ve made.”

Residents of all ages are encouraged to get tested, with or without symptoms, to identify where the disease is currently present in the community and where it is not. Testing continues to be an integral focus as more residents visit more businesses. Visit www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing for more information on testing locations and how to make an appointment.


___________________________________

Contact :
Office of Public Affairs
(916) 440-7259
Contact: CDPHpress@cdph.ca.gov

State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts

state seal


SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Public Health today announced the most recent statistics on COVID-19. California now has 133,489 confirmed cases and 4,697 deaths.

June 9 CA COVID-19 Numbers

Testing in California

As testing capacity continues to increase across the state, the California Department of Public Health is working to expand access to COVID-19 testing. Testing should be used for medical evaluation of persons with symptoms of COVID-19 as well as for efforts by public health agencies and essential employers to prevent and control the spread of COVID-19. Individuals prioritized for testing include: 

  • Hospitalized patients
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic healthcare workers, first responders, and other social service employees
  • Symptomatic individuals age 65 and older or symptomatic individuals of any age with chronic medical conditions that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness
  • Individuals who are tested as part of disease control efforts in high-risk settings
  • Asymptomatic residents and employees of congregate living facilities when needed to prevent disease transmission
  • Symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in essential occupations such as grocery store and food supply workers, utility workers and public employees
  • Other individuals with symptoms consistent with COVID-19

As of June 8, there have been 2,486,245 tests conducted in California and reported to the California Department of Public Health. This represents an increase of 55,055 tests over the prior 24-hour reporting period. These numbers include data from commercial, private and academic labs, including Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford, and the 25 state and county health labs currently testing. The Department is now reporting all tests reported in California, rather than the total number of individuals tested.

Data Portal
The state has launched a user-friendly data portal at COVID-19 Statewide Update that tracks COVID-19 cases statewide and by county, gender, age and ethnicity. The portal also outlines statewide hospitalizations and testing efforts. The data presented on the portal is updated daily and will include additional information as it is available.


Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture

The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the disproportionate prevalence of underlying conditions such as asthma and heart disease among Latinos and African American Californians. Only by looking at the full picture can we understand how to ensure the best outcomes for all Californians.

The differences in health outcomes related to COVID-19 are most stark in COVID-19 deaths. We have nearly complete data on race and ethnicity for COVID-19 deaths, and we are seeing the following trends. Overall, for adults 18 and older, Latinos, African Americans and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are dying at disproportionately higher levels. The proportion of COVID-19 deaths in African Americans is more than one-and-a-half times their population representation across all adult age categories. For Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, overall numbers are low, but more than double between the proportion of COVID-19 deaths and their population representation. More males are dying from COVID-19 than females, in line with national trends. More information is available at COVID-19 Race and Ethnicity Data.

 

Health Care Worker Infection Rates

As of June 8, local health departments have reported 11,171 confirmed positive cases in health care workers and 67 deaths statewide.


Your Actions Save Lives
Every person has a role to play. Protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense: 

  • Staying home except for essential needs/activities following local and state public health guidelines when patronizing approved businesses. To the extent that such sectors are re-opened, Californians may leave their homes to work at, patronize, or otherwise engage with those businesses, establishments or activities.
  • Practicing social distancing.
  • Wearing a cloth face mask when out in public.
  • Washing hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
  • Following guidance from public health officials.


What to Do if You Think You’re Sick

Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough or shortness of breath), call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken. More than 90 community testing sites also offer free, confidential testing: Find a COVID-19 Testing Site.

For more information about what Californians can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California.

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on the California Department of Public Health’s Guidance web page.


___________________________________

June 10, 2020

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Brooke Federico Public Information Officer
(951) 955-1130
bcfederico@rivco.org 

More businesses set to reopen Friday


Riverside County SealAs Riverside County continues to move to reopen its economy, county officials are announcing the types of businesses that may reopen Friday (June 12) as part of the state’s additional businesses now included in accelerated stage two. 

Riverside County health officials emphasize, however, that as residents visit more places in the community, it is ever-more important to take steps to protect themselves from coronavirus. Officials urge residents to continue to wear face coverings when they leave the home and maintain social distancing when out in public. Frequent hand washing is also important to help slow the spread of coronavirus. 

Residents are encouraged to visit businesses that are taking safety precautions for their employees and customers by following local guidance and industry-specific guidance issued by the state. Additional business guidance will be made available on RivCoBizHelp.org website, with input from the Riverside County Economic Recovery Task Force. 

“We have long looked forward to reopening more Riverside County businesses, which provide valuable goods, services and jobs vital to the fabric of our economy,” said Vice Chair Karen Spiegel, Second District Supervisor. “It’s very important that while visiting these businesses, all residents continue to do their part to slow the spread of the disease by wearing face coverings and maintaining six feet from others.” 

The businesses that will be eligible to open Friday include:
◼ Hotels, motels, inns (for tourism and travel)
◼ Schools, day camps, daycares
◼ Campgrounds and outdoor recreation
◼ Filming for television and music industries
◼ Restaurants, bars and wineries
◼ Museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums
◼ Professional sports (no audience)
◼ Movie theaters and family entertainment centers
◼ Gyms and fitness centers 

Among the business that are not allowed at this stage include some personal care businesses, including nail salons, threading and waxing, as well as youth sports, team sports, weddings and libraries. 

As always, residents of all ages are encouraged to get tested, with or without symptoms, to identify where the disease is currently present in the community and where it is not. Testing continues to be an integral focus as more residents visit more businesses. Visit www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus/testing for more information on testing locations and how to make an appointment.


___________________________________

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact: Jose Arballo Jr.
Riverside University Health System-Public Health
(951) 712-3705 - cell 

Coachella and Stagecoach Music Festivals Canceled 

Riverside County SealThe Coachella and Stagecoach music festivals, which were earlier postponed until October because of the growing spread of coronavirus, have been canceled for 2020.

Citing concerns over a possible autumn resurgence of COVID-19, Riverside County Public Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser today (June 10) signed the order canceling the popular festivals. The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and Stagecoach Country Music Festival were originally scheduled for April, but they were postponed until October after Kaiser issued a similar order.

“I am concerned as indications grow that COVID-19 could worsen in the fall,” said Kaiser. “In addition, events like Coachella and Stagecoach would fall under Governor Newsom’s Stage 4, which he has previously stated would require treatments or a vaccine to enter. Given the projected circumstances and potential, I would not be comfortable moving forward.

“These decisions are not taken lightly with the knowledge that many people will be impacted. My first priority is the health of the community.”

County officials have been in contact with Goldenvoice, which operates both the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and Stagecoach Festival 2020, and Kaiser praised the company for its efforts to protect the health of concert goers.

“After consulting with our public health officer and local leaders from the City of Indio and Goldenvoice, and with continued importance on public health, it was decided that postponing the concert series was appropriate and necessary,” said Chair V. Manuel Perez, Fourth District Supervisor.


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June 9, 2020

There are 129 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 6 deaths in Banning.

___________________________________


June 8, 2020

There are 122 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 6 deaths in Banning.

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Governor Newsom Announces Federal Health
and Safety Certification of Life-Saving N95 Masks 


BYD North America will begin shipping 150 million N95 masks to the state in the coming days for distribution to front-line workers

N95 masks come in addition to the 110 million surgical masks from BYD that California
has already distributed to help sectors reopen safely

Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO – Following through on California’s commitment to create a stable, reliable pipeline of life-saving personal protective equipment (PPE) coming into our state, Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that California-based BYD North America has received certification from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to produce N95 respirators for the state.

“Providing California’s front-line health care workers and responders the protective equipment they need is a critical part of our response to COVID-19. This new supply of N95 masks, as well as the surgical masks this contract has already provided, are game-changing and play a crucial role in our state’s public safety and reopening strategy,” said Governor Gavin Newsom.

With the certification now in hand, as outlined in the contract, BYD will produce and ship 150 million N95 masks to the state for distribution to health care workers and those identified by health officials as requiring respirator-style masks. The first shipment of N95 masks produced as part of this contract are expected to arrive in the coming days. The contract will ensure that the state has a sufficient supply of masks going forward should there be need for them in the future.

Cal OES had made NIOSH certification of N95 masks an explicit requirement of the contract with BYD so that California’s doctors, nurses and other front-line workers can be confident that the N95 masks they receive from the state are of the highest quality and meet federal health and safety standards.

Today’s announcement comes just days after Cal OES amended its contract with BYD North America to allow the company with manufacturing capacity overseas until June 12 to complete its certification process for N95 masks from NIOSH.

Background on BYD masks

The state’s contract with BYD is part of a wider effort by the administration to prioritize the procurement and dispersal of critical personal protective equipment and other emergency assets and commodities acquired through all sources during the COVID-19 pandemic to protect public health and safety.

To date, the state’s agreement with BYD has yielded more than 110 million surgical masks with more coming in nearly every day. The state has distributed BYD surgical masks to aid workers across the following sectors of the economy:

Distribution of BYD Surgical Masks by Sector:

Public Health (Local Government)        8,696,000

Agriculture                                         6,168,000

Social Services                                   74,000

Communications Infrastructure            6,000

Construction and Trade                       232,000

Education                                          2,578,000

Public Works and Utilities                    228,000

Hotels and Lodging                             402,000

Transportation (Transit, Ports)              514,000

Retail                                                 3,238,000

Businesses/Office Workspaces              320,000

Non-emergency Medical                       3,516,000

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June 6, 2020

There are 117 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 6 deaths in Banning.

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June 5, 2020

Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order on|
Actions in Response to COVID-19

Order will help increase the availability of hand sanitizer and medical devices during the pandemic

Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an executive order that will help increase the availability of over-the-counter drugs, such as hand sanitizer, and medical devices, such as respirators, ventilators and masks, which are in demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The order allows the temporary manufacture of over-the-counter drugs and medical devices by firms not currently licensed by the California Department of Public Health. The firms must apply for temporary registration and self-certify they are compliant with guidance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The order defers renewal fees to address COVID-19 related economic hardship for manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, food and cosmetics that currently have California Department of Public Health licenses, registrations, and certificates.

The order also addresses a variety of other issues in response to the COVID-19 pandemic by extending a number of waivers to allow for flexibility in the emergency placement of foster youth and ensure that foster youth have access to critical programs and technology by verifying foster care status for foster youth and wards of the juvenile court whose cases are pending; permit In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program caseworkers to continue their work caring for older adults and individuals with disabilities; and allow the California Department of Justice to develop procedures to perform name-based background checks to ensure there is no delay processing employment for critical sectors, such as health care services and care and support for vulnerable populations, including developmentally disabled persons.

In addition, the order extends statutory deadlines related to the timeframe of when a petition for reconsideration is deemed to have been denied by the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, and for the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board to act on decisions by Workers’ Compensation judges.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here and a copy can be found here.

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June 4, 2020

June 3, 2020

There are 115 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 6 deaths in Banning.

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Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order on Safe, Secure and Accessible General Election in November

Proclaims statewide General Election on Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today issued a proclamation declaring a statewide General Election on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, and signed an executive order to ensure that Californians can exercise their right to vote in a safe, secure and accessible manner during the upcoming election.

“We are committed to protecting the hard-fought right for Californians to make their voices heard this November, even in the face of a pandemic,” said Governor Newsom. “As the demonstrations across the country remind us, civic participation is critical to our democracy. If we are to address the racial inequities that exist in our institutions, policies and representation, we must ensure that all eligible Californians have an opportunity to safely cast their ballot.”

Recognizing the threat COVID-19 continues to pose to public health, the Governor last month signed an executive order requiring county elections officials to send vote-by-mail ballots to Californians registered to vote in the General Election, while ensuring that those who may need to access in-person voting opportunities are able to.

To curb the spread of COVID-19, today’s order ensures in-person voting opportunities are available in sufficient numbers to maintain physical distancing. It requires counties that are unable to comply with current law to provide three days of early voting starting the Saturday before election day and requires ballot drop-box locations be available between October 6 and November 3, while also allowing counties to consolidate voting locations, with at least one voting location per 10,000 registered voters.

The Administration will continue to work with the Legislature, the Secretary of State and county elections officials on how other aspects of the November election, such as voter education and outreach, will be implemented while preserving public health and giving county elections officials needed flexibility.

The text of the Governor’s executive order signed today can be found here and a copy can be found here. The text of the Governor’s proclamation can be found here and a copy can be found here.


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June 2, 2020

There are 112 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 6 deaths in Banning.

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June 1, 2020

There are 109 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 5 deaths in Banning.


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